40 Years of Decorating Innovation

March 1, 2004
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SGCD's DECO 2004 Conference and Exposition will mark the 40th year of this premier glass and ceramic decorating event

DECO 2004, hosted by the Society of Glass and Ceramic Decorators (SGCD), will give hundreds of professionals in the glass and ceramic decorating field the opportunity to learn about new techniques and technologies, as well as network with others in the industry. The event will be held at the Cincinnati Convention Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, March 27-30 and will feature both an exposition and an informative conference program.

More than 30 exhibitors will display leading-edge decorating equipment, materials, supplies and services at this year's show, giving visitors a chance to meet with experts in a range of areas and explore new decorating solutions. The technical program will encompass both a First Step seminar on the "Fundamentals of Decorating" and a Second Step seminar on "Advanced Techniques," as well as sessions on marketing, legislative issues, decorating materials and processes, and flat glass.

Following is an overview of what visitors can expect at this year's conference.

Step by Step

The First Step seminar will start at 9 a.m. on Saturday, March 27, and will provide a broad technical overview of glass and ceramic decorating. The program is specifically geared toward those who are new to the decorating industry, but it can also provide an opportunity for more experienced attendees to expand their knowledge of decorating processes beyond their individual specialties. The seminar will include a discussion of glass and ceramic substrates and materials, presented by Simon Bath of Johnson Matthey and Stephanie Sobers of Ferro Corp.; direct decorating techniques, presented by Susan Bebout of Homer Laughlin China Co., Steven Presutto of Coates Screen and Michael Taylor of Debuit of America; decorating special effects, presented by Simon Bath of Johnson Matthey, Bob McKay of McKay Frosting/Seppic and Jon Rarick of Reusche & Co.; and firing and finishing of decorated ware, presented by Wendell Keith of The Keith Co. and Brian Deszell of Custom Deco South.

The Second Step seminar will follow at 1 p.m. and will expand on concepts introduced in the First Step Seminar. The program will also include an "Ask the Experts" session and a regulatory update.

Innovations and Legislation

The "Marketing Design and Innovation" seminar will be held from 10 am. to noon on Sunday, March 28, and will discuss the essential elements of successful innovation and design in the tableware market. Topics will range from product and application technology to fashion trends and market awareness. The session will also include a review of how decal printers can best work with designers to produce innovative ware.

On Monday, a general session on legislative, regulatory and testing issues will be held from 9:15 a.m. to noon.

On Tuesday, the conference program will be split into two separate tracks: "Decorating Materials and Processes," held from 8:30 a.m. to noon; and "Flat Glass," held from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. The first track will cover topics such as lead-free decorating alternatives for the container industry, presented by Joe Ryan, George Sakoske, Dave Klimas and Geoff Weinstock of Ferro Corp.; overlapping transmutation glazes, presented by Stan Sulewski of Pfaltzgraff Co.; organic inks and coatings for the glass industry, presented by David Kapp of Ferro Corp.; and decorating glass with thermoplastic decorative precious metal products, presented by Ser F. Spronck of Johnson Matthey Glass.

The "Flat Glass" track will include discussions on the influence of various glass substrates on UV-curable automotive enamel systems, presented by Rob Prunchak of Engelhard Corp.; and a spandrel reverse glass roller coater startup procedure, presented by Jim Zerla of Ferro Corp.

Discovering New Designs

Entries for the 2004 Discovery Awards and Silent Auction will also be on display at DECO 2004. The Discovery Room will be open from noon to 7 p.m. on Sunday, from noon to 5 p.m. on Monday, and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Tuesday. The Discovery Award and Silent Auction winners will be announced during the 40th anniversary celebration dinner on Tuesday evening.

For more information about DECO 2004 or SGCD, call (740) 588-9882, fax (740) 588-0245, e-mail sgcd@sgcd.org, or visit http://www.sgcd.org. A full conference program can also be downloaded as a PDF at http://www.ceramicindustry.com/ci/cda/articleinformation/news/news_item/0,,117214,00+en-uss_01dbc.html



Legislative Update: Proposition 65 Allegations Filed Against Tile Retailers and Importer

by Andrew Bopp, Public Affairs Director, Society of Glass and Ceramic Decorators

A private attorney in California has filed 60-day Proposition 65 notices against several major retailers and a tile importer relating to lead and glazed tile sold at retail stores. California's Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65) requires consumer warnings if a product contains one of a wide variety of chemicals, including lead. Warnings can be posted using stick-on labels, statements on packaging or at the place of sale.

In early 2003, another private attorney filed several lawsuits alleging Proposition 65 warning violations related to lead exposure from the outside surface of drinkware. The cases were filed in California against retailers and tableware manufacturers. As of mid-February 2004, settlement negotiations and the litigation process were still under way between plaintiff and defendants related to these drinkware allegations. The plaintiff making the tile allegations is not involved in the Proposition 65 allegations related to lead and drinkware.

Current glass and ceramic food contact surface "safe-harbor" no-warning lead leaching thresholds were adopted in relation to a 1993 settlement between the California Attorney General and several tableware producers. The settlement requires tableware sellers to use specific ASTM/AOAC tests to determine metal leaching levels from glass and ceramic food contact surfaces. Specific consumer warnings must be posted for any ware that is shown to leach in excess of specific limits for lead and cadmium.

More details on the current Proposition 65 allegations and the existing tableware settlement will be presented at DECO 2004. Andrew Bopp can be reached at (703) 838-2810 or andyb@sgcd.org.

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