Ceramic Industry

Should the Government Set Security Standards to Prevent Cyber Attacks?

May 1, 2012
In last week’s CI CyberNews CyberPoll, we asked readers if the U.S. government should be able to set minimum security standards for companies to follow in order to prevent cyber attacks. Most of the respondents (60%) answered yes, while 30% do not believe the government should set these standards. The remaining respondents (10%) are unsure.
 
Comments included:
 
“Since a successful attack on our critical systems could even bring down our defense system and power grid, it is a justifiable part of national security.”
 
“Yes, but only if they are venders for the govt.; otherwise, the free market should decide if they want to do business with companies based on their security measures.”
 
“It is okay for NIST or Homeland Security to study and make recommendations, but the federal government probably should not ‘set’ a minimum standard. This would become like OSHA, a race to the bottom. Each company is different and has different needs. There is no way a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach will work for all companies and private entities. Each company should work to be as secure as possible in the way that makes sense for them. Government needs to be better about preventing attacks and prosecuting countries that attack us, not dictating how its citizens (and companies) should conduct business.”
 
“What, other than fighting wars, has the government done right?”
 
Are you interested in taking the industry’s pulse on a particular topic? Send your suggestions for CyberPoll questions to Kelsey Seidler at seidlerk@bnpmedia.com.
 
Many thanks to all of the CI CyberNews readers who have participated in our CyberPolls. Not a CI CyberNews subscriber? Follow this link to sign up for your free subscription! In last week’s CI CyberNews CyberPoll, we asked readers if the U.S. government should be able to set minimum security standards for companies to follow in order to prevent cyber attacks. Most of the respondents (60%) answered yes, while 30% do not believe the government should set these standards. The remaining respondents (10%) are unsure.
 
Comments included:
 
“Since a successful attack on our critical systems could even bring down our defense system and power grid, it is a justifiable part of national security.”
 
“Yes, but only if they are venders for the govt.; otherwise, the free market should decide if they want to do business with companies based on their security measures.”
 
“It is okay for NIST or Homeland Security to study and make recommendations, but the federal government probably should not ‘set’ a minimum standard. This would become like OSHA, a race to the bottom. Each company is different and has different needs. There is no way a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach will work for all companies and private entities. Each company should work to be as secure as possible in the way that makes sense for them. Government needs to be better about preventing attacks and prosecuting countries that attack us, not dictating how its citizens (and companies) should conduct business.”
 
“What, other than fighting wars, has the government done right?”
 
Are you interested in taking the industry’s pulse on a particular topic? Send your suggestions for CyberPoll questions to Kelsey Seidler at seidlerk@bnpmedia.com.
 
Many thanks to all of the CI CyberNews readers who have participated in our CyberPolls. Not a CI CyberNews subscriber? Follow this link to sign up for your free subscription! In last week’s CI CyberNews CyberPoll, we asked readers if the U.S. government should be able to set minimum security standards for companies to follow in order to prevent cyber attacks. Most of the respondents (60%) answered yes, while 30% do not believe the government should set these standards. The remaining respondents (10%) are unsure.
 
Comments included:
 
“Since a successful attack on our critical systems could even bring down our defense system and power grid, it is a justifiable part of national security.”
 
“Yes, but only if they are venders for the govt.; otherwise, the free market should decide if they want to do business with companies based on their security measures.”
 
“It is okay for NIST or Homeland Security to study and make recommendations, but the federal government probably should not ‘set’ a minimum standard. This would become like OSHA, a race to the bottom. Each company is different and has different needs. There is no way a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach will work for all companies and private entities. Each company should work to be as secure as possible in the way that makes sense for them. Government needs to be better about preventing attacks and prosecuting countries that attack us, not dictating how its citizens (and companies) should conduct business.”
 
“What, other than fighting wars, has the government done right?”
 
Are you interested in taking the industry’s pulse on a particular topic? Send your suggestions for CyberPoll questions to Kelsey Seidler at seidlerk@bnpmedia.com.
 

  In last week’s CI CyberNews CyberPoll, we asked readers if the U.S. government should be able to set minimum security standards for companies to follow in order to prevent cyber attacks. Most of the respondents (60%) answered yes, while 30% do not believe the government should set these standards. The remaining respondents (10%) are unsure.

Comments included:
 
“Since a successful attack on our critical systems could even bring down our defense system and power grid, it is a justifiable part of national security.”
 
“Yes, but only if they are venders for the govt.; otherwise, the free market should decide if they want to do business with companies based on their security measures.”
 
“It is okay for NIST or Homeland Security to study and make recommendations, but the federal government probably should not ‘set’ a minimum standard. This would become like OSHA, a race to the bottom. Each company is different and has different needs. There is no way a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach will work for all companies and private entities. Each company should work to be as secure as possible in the way that makes sense for them. Government needs to be better about preventing attacks and prosecuting countries that attack us, not dictating how its citizens (and companies) should conduct business.”
 
“What, other than fighting wars, has the government done right?”
 
Are you interested in taking the industry’s pulse on a particular topic? Send your suggestions for CyberPoll questions to Kelsey Seidler at seidlerk@bnpmedia.com.
 
Many thanks to all of the CI CyberNews readers who have participated in our CyberPolls. Not a CI CyberNews subscriber? Follow this link to sign up for your free subscription!